The forme of representation between word and image

Volume 8, Issue 1, February 2024     |     PP. 150-160      |     PDF (173 K)    |     Pub. Date: December 2, 2020
DOI:    212 Downloads     1717 Views  

Author(s)

Alessandro Prato, University of Siena, Italy

Abstract
This essay aims to analyse the rhetorical device of hypotyposis, which is held in great consideration both by ancient rhetoricians (Aristotle, Cicero and Quintilian) and by modern critics (Dumarsais, Barthes and Eco) for its capacity to portray visual experiences through the use of words, so as to make them as perceptible as if they were present before the reader’s eyes. The essay compares hypotyposis with other similar rhetorical strategies, such as description (an important moment in which the narratio is suspended and the author describes a place or character), evidentia, and especially ekphrasis - which comes from ekphràzo, meaning “describe, represent”, it is used with reference to the description of artworks - which all exercise a significant persuasive function, for they make arguments more tangible and convincing.

Keywords
Elocutio; rhetoric; language; representation; persuasion;

Cite this paper
Alessandro Prato, The forme of representation between word and image , SCIREA Journal of Sociology. Volume 8, Issue 1, February 2024 | PP. 150-160.

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