CULTURAL AND PHYSIOGRAPHIC BASIS FOR REGIONALIZATION OF INDIA

Volume 7, Issue 3, June 2023     |     PP. 60-77      |     PDF (3883 K)    |     Pub. Date: November 21, 2023
DOI: 10.54647/geosciences170291    39 Downloads     901 Views  

Author(s)

Prithvish Nag, Former: Surveyor General of India, Vice-Chancellor of Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapith University and Director, National Atlas & Thematic Mapping Organisation (NATMO).

Abstract
India has one of the most ancient, rich, vibrant, dynamic, extensive and varied civilization of the world which has its roots in different components of culture. Such traditions are reflected from the ancient Indian literature, history and archeological remains. Along with the physiography, it has contributed to evolving the regional characteristics. This country presents a special case where the national and regional identities have been considered as an important component of culture. The formation of the sixteen janpads (districts or provinces) in ancient India is the testimony of such a unique trait. Later attempts for regionalization of India did take into consideration of this feature.

Keywords
Culture, traditions, mahajanpads, regionalization, Puranas, Uttarapatha and Dakshinapatha

Cite this paper
Prithvish Nag, CULTURAL AND PHYSIOGRAPHIC BASIS FOR REGIONALIZATION OF INDIA , SCIREA Journal of Geosciences. Volume 7, Issue 3, June 2023 | PP. 60-77. 10.54647/geosciences170291

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